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Narcos: Rise of the Cartels [PS4/X1/Switch/PC]

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Doobieters
Door Doobieters (21670 reacties) op 16-11-2018 10:52
( PM )
Uitgever Curve Digital komt met een turn-based strategiegame die is gebaseerd op de Netflix-serie Narcos. Het spel komt in het derde kwartaal van volgend jaar uit voor de pc en consoles. De uitgever laat nu de eerste beelden zien van Narcos: Rise of the Cartels.

De makers omschrijven het spel als een gewelddadige turn-based actiestrategiegame, waarin de gebeurtenissen van de Netflix-serie terugkomen. Spelers kunnen de rol aan nemen van de DEA of van een drugskartel. In de korte teaser zijn alleen omgevingen te zien, geen personages of gameplay.

Eerder dit jaar werd de ontwikkeling van Narcos: Rise of the Cartels al aangekondigd. Toen werd gesteld dat het spel in het voorjaar van 2019 zou uitkomen. Nu zegt de uitgever dat de game in het derde kwartaal van dat jaar verschijnt. Narcos: Rise of the Cartels komt naar de pc en naar consoles, maar welke is nog niet bekend.

Op Netflix is vanaf vrijdag het vierde seizoen van de serie Narcos te zien. Het eerste seizoen staat sinds augustus 2015 op de streamingdienst. De serie gaat over drugskartels in Zuid-Amerika. De eerste drie seizoenen spelen zich af in Colombia en gaan over Pablo Escobar en over het Cali-kartel. Het vierde seizoen heeft een andere cast en gaat over drugshandel in Mexico.



Last edited on: 19-09-2019 21:22
Keep absolutely still. Its vision is based on movement.
Doobieters
Door Doobieters (21670 reacties) op 16-11-2018 10:53
( PM )
Cocaine kick
Keep absolutely still. Its vision is based on movement.
Koen
Door Koen (2594 reacties) op 16-11-2018 13:37
( PM )
X-Com Narcos?
3DS: 2251-8605-7536 | Switch: 3045-6572-6038 | XBL: Kip20Koen
Doobieters
Door Doobieters (21670 reacties) op 16-11-2018 13:38
( PM )
Quote:
X-Com Narcos?
Gepost door: Koen op 16-11-2018 13:37

Ik hoop het, zou wel een interessante combi kunnen zijn.
Keep absolutely still. Its vision is based on movement.
Doobieters
Door Doobieters (21670 reacties) op 19-09-2019 21:22
( PM )

Keep absolutely still. Its vision is based on movement.
Doobieters
Door Doobieters (21670 reacties) op 20-09-2019 20:25
( PM )














Keep absolutely still. Its vision is based on movement.
Beunhaaz
Door Beunhaaz (3723 reacties) op 20-09-2019 21:08
( PM )
Dit zou een heerlijke game zijn voor de ps vita :-)
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ktugach
Door ktugach (11139 reacties) op 20-09-2019 21:21
Rol: Administrator
( PM )
Voor de switch staat ie op http://www.amazon.es/Narcos-Rise-of-The-Cartels/dp/B07X35Q5HC
Doobieters
Door Doobieters (21670 reacties) op 20-09-2019 21:24
( PM )
Quote:
Voor de switch staat ie op http://www.amazon.es/Narcos-Rise-of-The-Cartels/dp/B07X35Q5HC
Gepost door: ktugach op 20-09-2019 21:21

Voor PS4 en Xbox One ook geloof ik.

edit: O nee, alleen voor de PS4. Vreemd genoeg maar 34.99 voor PS4.
Keep absolutely still. Its vision is based on movement.
L1F3Stream
Door L1F3Stream (3999 reacties) op 20-09-2019 21:30
( PM )
Interesting, in de gaten houden voor de Switch
The Hamster
Door The Hamster (2187 reacties) op 20-09-2019 21:32
( PM )
Quote:
[..]
Voor PS4 en Xbox One ook geloof ik.

edit: O nee, alleen voor de PS4. Vreemd genoeg maar 34.99 voor PS4.
Gepost door: Doobieters op 20-09-2019 21:24


Is niet zo vreemd hoor. is toch algemeen bekend dat er een switch tax is
Doobieters
Door Doobieters (21670 reacties) op 27-10-2019 13:55
( PM )


Narcos: Rise of the Cartels verschijnt 19 november voor de pc en PlayStation 4, 21 november voor de Nintendo Switch en 22 november voor de Xbox One.


Keep absolutely still. Its vision is based on movement.
Doobieters
Door Doobieters (21670 reacties) op 09-11-2019 11:08
( PM )
Eerste twee previews:

1. Tech Advisor
So, why is Narcos: Rise of the Cartels different to a sea of failed officially licensed games over the years? You see, the developers had access to all kinds of assets from the show, including behind-the-scenes images of the sets as well as input from showrunners, which were used for the in-game recreation.

The game aims to recreate the same colour grading, environments and even the uniforms used by the series, and it even features characters with a likeness to their real-life counterparts – unlike a certain recently-announced game.

You’ll even see 10 minutes of footage from the series sprinkled in throughout the game, and that’s because Narcos: Rise of the Cartels follows the story arc of the first series of the Netflix show, up until the scene where (SPOILER ALERT) El Patron escapes La Catedral and goes into hiding. The game is split into two halves, allowing you to play as both the DEA and the cartel, with each featuring nine main missions and 20 side missions ranging from extractions to executions and more.

In terms of the actual gameplay, you should expect a turn-based strategy game with tile-based movement and vertical level design in a similar vein to the surprisingly popular Mario + Rabbids: Kingdom Battle, but with key differences to make Rise of the Cartels stand on its own.

The biggest difference is the third-person shooter element that Rise of the Cartels employs. While the majority of the action is turn-based and plays through in a fairly standard manner, you’ll get certain situations where you take control of the various characters, aim and pull the trigger yourself.

These are called counteractions, much like the defensive attributes of characters in other turn-based games and activate if a) you’ve got enough points and b) an enemy crosses your line of sight. At that point, you’ll get a couple of seconds to line up your shot and take them out – just make sure you don’t miss.

These real-time shots can also be triggered when you hit critical damage on an enemy, and Chain Reaction can be activated if multiple enemies are in view, allowing you to potentially take out two enemies in a single move.

Another key difference is that Rise of the Cartels features 1v1 movement instead of team-based movement. This gives the game a notably more reactive feel, and forces players to think more tactically about which character to move.

There are a variety of systems at play, including covering, healing and manual reloading, and these all apply to the opposing team too. Will you sacrifice a potential attack to heal? Or do you take the risk and hope that your shot will take the enemy out? The game features permadeath, so these decisions can’t be made lightly.

That choice also applies to the characters on your squad – you can assign up to six characters in your team at any one time, each offering different strengths and weaknesses. They’re split into different classes, including SpecOps (which feature protective gear), Search Bloc and Team Leaders, with the latter of which being some of the show’s key characters.

You can also recruit new soldiers throughout the course of the campaign, each with unique traits and actions that can help turn the tide of the war against the cartel and the DEA.

In essence, Narcos: Rise of the Cartels looks to be one of the better-designed officially licensed games coming to market, building on an increasingly popular format with elements unique to the series it’s based on.

2. PC Gamer
Netflix’s push into games continues this month with Narcos: Rise of the Cartels, which publisher Curve Digital has today announced will release on 19 November. Based on drug war drama Narcos, the game translates the show's action into a cops-vs-gangs turn-based strategy campaign.

I recently got the chance to play a near-final build, and was pleasantly surprised to discover something rather more adventurous than you might expect from a TV adaptation. On the surface, it has the look of a straightforward XCOM clone: you build a stable of soldiers, send squads out on missions, and control them in small-scale battles with tough odds and permadeath. But rather than a typical turn order—you move all your guys, then the enemy moves all theirs—it has alternating activations, similar to many modern tabletop wargames. In other words, every time you do something, your foe immediately gets to do something in response.

Not only that, but on your turn you can activate anyone you like—it doesn’t matter how many times they’ve already moved. Theoretically, you can just pick your favourite soldier over and over, fighting a one-man war against the cartels.

That’s where the strategy comes in, though, and it’s a surprisingly different challenge to most turn-based games. Focus too much on one character, and they’ll quickly find themselves surrounded, but equally every time you activate a straggler to catch them up, you’re leaving your frontline motionless and potentially vulnerable. In the XCOM games, despite their tight difficulty, there’s always a share of undramatic actions—creeping this guy a couple of squares forward, telling this one to just hunker down and wait. In Narcos, there’s a tension in every turn.

Make a mistake, and you’ve no chance to compensate with the rest of your team—the enemy is going to take advantage immediately. And that cascades through the mission, with every turn spent retreating an accidentally vulnerable soldier into better cover being a lost turn of shooting from someone else, or a chance for your opposition to reposition.

To be clear, it’s not tactical perfection. The drug war set-up makes for a relatively dry theme for anyone not a fan of the show, and there’s a general lack of polish that leaves no doubt this is a budget title. But I left my demo intrigued to play around more with that core twist, and the promise of a story campaign that can be played in full from either side—DEA or druglords—is pleasingly ambitious. Don’t expect white gold, then, but I'm hopeful for at least beige silver.
Keep absolutely still. Its vision is based on movement.
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